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  • Authors: Ronald S. Irving. (2004)

  • This book began life as a set of notes that I developed for a course at the University of Washington entitled Introduction to Modern Algebra for Tea- ers. Originally conceived as a text for future secondary-school mathematics teachers, it has developed into a book that could serve well as a text in an - dergraduatecourseinabstractalgebraoracoursedesignedasanintroduction to higher mathematics. This book di?ers from many undergraduate algebra texts in fundamental ways; the reasons lie in the book’s origin and the goals I set for the course. The course is a two-quarter sequence required of students intending to f- ?ll the requirements of the teacher preparation option for our B.A. degree in mathematics, or of the teacher preparation minor. It is required as well of those intending to m...

  • Book


  • Authors: John E. Floyd (2010)

  • This manuscript should be useful for economics and business students enrolled in basic courses in statistics and, as well, for people who have studied statistics some time ago and need a review of what they are supposed to have learned.

  • Book


  • Authors: R.D. Hewins (2014)

  • People in business, economics and the social sciences are increasingly aware of the need to be able to handle a range of mathematical tools. This course is designed to fill this need by extending the 100 courses in Mathematics and Statistics into several even more practical and powerful areas of mathematics. It is not just forecasting and index numbers that have uses. Such things as differential equations and stochastic processes, for example, do have direct, frequent and practical applications to everyday management situations. This course is intended to extend your mathematical ability and interests beyond the knowledge acquired in earlier 100 courses. Throughout the mathematical and quantitative courses of the degrees we attempt to emphasise the applications of mathematics for m...

  • Book


  • Authors: Richard Crandall (2005)

  • Prime numbers beckon to the beginner, as the basic notion of primality is accessible even to children. Yet, some of the simplest questions about primes have confounded humankind for millennia. In the new edition of this highly successful book, Richard Crandall and Carl Pomerance have provided updated material on theoretical, computational, and algorithmic fronts. New results discussed include the AKS test for recognizing primes, computational evidence for the Riemann hypothesis, a fast binary algorithm for the greatest common divisor, nonuniform fast Fourier transforms, and more. The authors also list new computational records and survey new developments in the theory of prime numbers, including the magnificent proof that there are arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions of primes,...

  • Book


  • Authors: Mokhtar S. Bazaraa (2006)

  • Nonlinear Programming: Theory and Algorithms—now in an extensively updated Third Edition—addresses the problem of optimizing an objective function in the presence of equality and inequality constraints. Many realistic problems cannot be adequately represented as a linear program owing to the nature of the nonlinearity of the objective function and/or the nonlinearity of any constraints. The Third Edition begins with a general introduction to nonlinear programming with illustrative examples and guidelines for model construction.

  • Book


  • Authors: Reinhard Diestel (2000)

  • Almost two decades after the appearance of most of the classical texts on the theory, this fresh introduction offers a reassessment of the main fields, methods and results today. Viewed as a branch of pure mathematics, the theory of finite graphs is developed as a coherent subject in its own right, with its own unifying questions and methods. The book thus seeks to complement, not replace, the existing, more algorithmic treatments, and can be used at various levels. It contains all the standard material for a first undergraduate course, complete with detailed proofs and numerous illustrations. While, for graduates, the text offers proofs of several more advanced results, most of which appear in a book for the first time. These proofs are described with as much care and detail as the...

  • Book


  • Authors: Ian Jacques (2006)

  • Mathematics for Economics and Business provides a thorough foundation in mathematical methods for economics, business studies and accountancy students. Assuming little prior knowledge, this informal text is a great companion for those who have not studied maths in depth before. This book truly promotes self-study as students are encouraged to tackle problems as they go along and can see fully worked examples to help their understanding. Both beginners and more advanced students will find material in this book relevant to their needs.

  • Book


  • Authors: Sergei Treil (2014)

  • The title of the book sounds a bit mysterious. Why should anyone read this book if it presents the subject in a wrong way? What is particularly done “wrong” in the book? Before answering these questions, let me first describe the target audience of this text. This book appeared as lecture notes for the course “Honors Linear Algebra”. It supposed to be a first linear algebra course for mathematically advanced students. It is intended for a student who, while not yet very familiar with abstract reasoning, is willing to study more rigorous mathematics than what is presented in a “cookbook style” calculus type course. Besides being a first course in linear algebra it is also supposed to be a first course introducing a student to rigorous proof, formal definitions in short, to the style...

  • Book


  • Authors: Titu Andreescu (2007)

  • This challenging problem book by renowned US Olympiad coaches, mathematics teachers, and researchers develops a multitude of problem-solving skills needed to excel in mathematical contests and in mathematical research in number theory. Offering inspiration and intellectual delight, the problems throughout the book encourage students to express their ideas in writing to explain how they conceive problems, what conjectures they make, and what conclusions they reach. Applying specific techniques and strategies, readers will acquire a solid understanding of the fundamental concepts and ideas of number theory.